Workshops & Tutorials

NEW THIS YEAR!  Dedicated technical tracks addressing Automotive, EMC Education, and EMP/IEMI are scheduled during the symposium week.  See below for these special tracks and all the peer-reviewed Workshops and Tutorials that will place over August 2-6, 2021, from 11:00 am - 3:30 pm EDT each day. 

For convenience, the Automotive sessions are designated with a symbol

EMC Education sessions are designated with a symbol

EMP/IEMI sessions are designated with a symbol.  

If these topics interest you, you can attend one session on your topic of choice per day!  These are just some of the 40+ sessions available for you from August 2-6! 

Good News!  ALL sessions below will be available on-demand following the symposium if you can’t decide between which session to attend live. 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-MON-1

Monday, 2 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Automotive EMC Joint Tutorial & Workshop

  • Marco Klingler, Stellantis
  • Hermes Jose Loschi, University of Twente 
  • Douglas Aguiar do Nascimento, Uniwersytet Zielonogorski Wydzial Informatyki Elektrotechniki i Automatyki, Vélizy-Villacoublay

Automotive electric/electronic systems are endlessly growing in complexity with a permanent constraint of a constant or reduced time-to-market. Therefore, there is a strong need to improve constantly the efficiency of the EMC related tasks throughout the entire development process, starting from the design phase until the full-vehicle validation phase. Thus, this Automotive EMC Joint Tutorial & Workshop contemplates two parts: Part I will be a tutorial on numerical simulation in the automotive environment, focusing on EMC. Aiming to provide a holistic and educational approach to understand the different methods and techniques used to mitigate EMI problems in the automotive environment. Part I presentations will cover EMC issues at a system, sub-system, equipment, and component levels. In particular, the speakers' topics will include virtual EMC automotive simulation environments, considering: cables, transistors, PCBs, electric powertrains systems, and electrified vehicles. Part II will be a workshop on automotive EMC. Aiming to present an overview of the most recent industry advances in the field of automotive EMC design, modeling, and simulation, as well as in the field of automotive standards, testing, and measurements. Part II presentations will cover EMC issues at a system, sub-system, equipment, and component levels. In particular, the speakers' topics will include hybrid power-train systems EMC analysis, low frequency magnetic field, antenna implementation, equipment design, printed-circuit-board optimization, electric/electronic component characterization, testing, standards, and regulations.

 

 

TUTORIAL

  WT-MON-2

Monday, 2 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Fundamentals

  • Frank Leferink, University of Twente, De Lutte,  Netherlands

This tutorial is an overview of many of the major topics that need to be considered when designing an electronic product or system to meet signal and power integrity (SIPI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements. The tutorial will present the foundational ideas from physics and mathematics and will demonstrate the engineering approaches to help the attendees to successfully design, evaluate, diagnose, and/or solve EMI problems. The main objective of this tutorial is to provide a learning opportunity for those that are new to EMC as well as provide a review of the basics to those who already have some experience in this area.

 

 

TUTORIAL

  WT-MON-3

Monday, 2 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Modeling of Intentional Electromagnetic Interference (IEMI) Scenarios

  • Frank Sabath, Bundeswehr Research Institute for Protective Technologies and NBC Protection, Garstedt,  Germany

The tutorial is dedicated to the specification of the intentional electromagnetic (IEMI) threat scenario. A detailed discussion shows that the well-known electromagnetic coupling model requires an extension by a human dimension to map all aspects, which are relevant offender, source, interference channel, target system and user provides a basic structure for an IEMI scenario model. The model of a generic offender is developed to describe the unknown attacker. The model consists of probability distribution functions for the aspects expertise and financial resources, which are derived from statistical data and an expert’s survey. The second unknown aspect of the IEMI scenario, the IEMI source used by the attacker, is considered in the following part of the tutorial. This part starts by introducing the principle structure of IEMI sources and a brief description of necessary modules. In addition to the technical performance and operating parameters non-technical aspects as expertise required for design and operation, availability of modules and components and related costs are also considered. The modeling procedure for possible IEMI sources starts with the breakdown of the usable volume of possible carrier platforms into partial volumes for the modules. The main performance data of the modules are estimated from the partial volumes via the module models. In a subsequent modeling step the performance of the modules are combined into performance data for the overall system. The comparison of non-technical characteristics (e.g. required expertise, availability and costs) with the capabilities of the generic offender enables the estimation of the probability that the considered IEMI source occurs in a criminal activity. The applicability of the introduced modeling method is demonstrated by modeling an existing IEMI source. The modeling of the electromagnetic threat scenario is completed in chapter 9 by estimating its likelihood. For this purpose, the environment of the target system is evaluated in terms of the accessibility and the necessary mobility. The probability that an EMI source of a considered type occurs at a given location in the surrounding of the target system is estimated by comparing the necessary mobility at the location with the mobility of the IEMI source.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-MON-4

Monday, 2 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Smart Grid and EMC Issues

  • Mike McInerney, Consultant, Champaign, IL, USA

Smart Grid (as used in electric power systems) continues to be a hot topic worldwide. Smart Grid (SG) interest and installations continue to increase, as do EMC issues to keep the grid operating. This tutorial will begin with a review of the activities of the IEEE EMC Special Committee 1 (SC 1) which coordinates Smart Grid EMC activity within the IEEE EMC Society. The tutorial will focus on the status at the end of 2020. The tutorial will continue with a review of the activities of the of the key Smart Grid EMC working group in the United States (Smart Electric Power Alliance – SEPA). These activities focus on SG devices that are exposed to the electromagnetic environment where the grid traverses and is terminated. The tutorial will also give specific examples of the EMC immunity testing needed for smart devices used in power station and substation environments based on EMC work accomplished in the IEC. The tutorial will also place in perspective the EMC work still needed to be done to make EMC an integral part of the Smart Grid activity/operation. As part of the tutorial we will present links for free SEPA webinars on the extent/severity of the EMC problems in the SG, test setups needed to perform realistic EMC immunity tests, and what to consider in planning long term EMC applications as the SG ages. An update of the effects of conducted emissions in the 2 – 150 kHz frequency band on the operation of the SG will also be presented.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-MON-5

Monday, 2 August •  11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Considerations for Amateur Radio Stations

  • Karen Burnham, Electro Magnetic Applications, Inc., Lakewood, CO, USA

Amateur Radio Operators have needed to deal with EMC (RFI) problems on a very personal level when neighbors experience interference with their commercial entertainment services or a home-owners association (HOA) objects to the presence of a ‘sender’ in their home.  Even if the amateur is not the source of the interference signal, their prominent and highly visible antennas often make them the recipient of complaints. In the interests of domestic tranquility, approaches that combine both personal interactions and technical solutions are needed, in that order, to manage these conflicts. Amateur Radio antennas often become the tallest electrical conductor in the immediate area and therefore also become the local focus of potential cloud electrical discharges (lightning).  As such the grounding for the antenna and all the equipment in the radio station is vital.  For safety, ground protection should be the first element installed, before even the antenna.  This tutorial session will contain useful information for both current and future Ham radio enthusiasts.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-MON-6

Monday, 2 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Military EMC Tutorial

  • Robert Davis, Lockheed Martin Corp, Syracuse, NY, USA
  • Larry Cohen, US Naval Research Laboratory, Wahsington DC, USA
  • Carl Hager, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division, Dahlgren, VA, USA

The objective of this tutorial is to enhance our attendee’s knowledge and understanding of key aspects of Military EMC that will help them in the performance their jobs. Achieving electromagnetic compatibility with military equipment, systems, and platforms requires significant effort. EMC must be considered at all lifecycle stages and involves first characterizing the operational electromagnetic environment (EME) and then design/testing military systems at various stages of production, assembly and integration. Numerous Military EMC standards and handbooks have been developed for electromagnetic environmental effects (E3) measurements and analysis to reduce the risk of equipment and systems failing to meet their operational performance requirements due to detrimental E3. Additionally, significant spectrum is being shared with commercial entities and hence E3 challenges are increasing. The tutorial will cover a broad range of Military EMC topics specifically including “Standards and DoD Directives & Instructions”, “RF Spectrum Engineering”, “Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance”, “Military Electromagnetic Modelling Techniques” and “RF Test & Measurement Techniques”. The presenters are subject matter experts, representing a cross section of the DoD EMC agencies (Air Force, Army and Navy).

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-MON-7

Monday, 2 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC and OTA Tests of Wireless Devices in Reverberation Chambers

  • Valter Mariani Primiani, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona,  Italy
  • Gabriele Gradoni, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK

The rich stochastic variability of the reverberation chamber (RC) field is useful in electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) testing, immunity and emission, as well as in material characterization, shielding effectiveness, antenna characterization, and for the assessment of human exposure limits to electromagnetic fields. Modern wireless communication systems face very complex propagation conditions within urban and indoor channels supporting rich multi-path fading. The fading is stochastic as it is underpinned by the presence of moving scattering objects and people. These real-life propagation conditions are well reproduced by the RC stochastic field, more realistic than anechoic chambers for wireless device testing. RCs reproduce different propagation environments by the optimal insertion of absorbing materials, which mitigate reflections and tailor the chamber losses to match the real environment ones.Testing of wireless devices and systems is becoming increasingly important in the technological development of Long Term Evolution (LTE) and 5G mobile networks. Both mobile and base station manufacturers are interested in assessing system performance and user perceived quality in realistic propagation environments, including indoor and outdoor conditions. Beside the classical statistical analysis of the field inside an RC, to carry out complete over-the-air (OTA) tests also other physical quantities are of vital interest, such as the power delay profile (PDP), the Rician K- factor, the coherence bandwidth, the time delay spread, and so on. OTA tests can be efficiently carried out on wireless devices and on entire base stations by tuning the above parameters accordingly. In addition, the EMC problems of 5G systems are exacerbated by the presence of complex high-frequency, multifunctional, digital circuits and numerous wireless devices deployed throughout the propagation channel. Not only the EMC tests need to evaluate emission and immunity, but also identify the key sources of EMC failures. Due to the complexity of 5G systems, the analysis and identification of EMC failure sources are particularly intricate and challenging. Therefore, new test solutions and post-processing techniques are needed to address the challenges of 5G EMC tests, also assessing for coexistence constrains with existing fixed and mobile installations.The variation of the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR), for combined immunity and coexisting analysis inside the RC , allows for creating enhanced immunity tests tailored to the wireless systems, also including real-life base stations (to substitute current base station emulators). Inside the RC, emission tests can be easily extended to in-band radiated power tests aimed at checking EMF exposure and its minimization. Therefore, the combination inside the same facility of EMC and OTA tests makes the production/certification cycle efficient and reliable.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-MON-8

Monday, 2 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Product Safety Compliance and Global Market Access

  • Grant Schmidbauer, Nemko USA, Inc.,  Carlsbad, CA, USA

The goal of most companies is not to only design products to be safe, perform according to customer demands, and to meet regulatory requirements, it is to sell those products globally. While your product must comply with the EMC and SIPI requirements, there are a myriad of other technical requirement that must also be considered to facilitate the sale of the product. The plan for this tutorial is to delve into some of the “other technical requirements” that products must comply with, including product safety requirements (ie, concepts such as fire, shock, mechanical, temperature, and radiation); and then once your products are compliant, we will discuss the commercialization of the product through obtaining the many country approvals that are needed in order to legally sell the product around the world. This tutorial should be attended by product realization managers, design engineers, test technicians, product regulatory personnel, project managers, marketing personnel, and others interested in learning more about product safety and global market access requirements.

 

TUTORIAL

WT-TUE-1

Tuesday, 3 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Automotive EMC Joint Tutorial & Workshop

  • Marco Klingler, Stellantis
  • Hermes Jose Loschi, University of Twente 
  • Douglas Aguiar do Nascimento, Uniwersytet Zielonogorski Wydzial Informatyki Elektrotechniki i Automatyki, Vélizy-Villacoublay

Automotive electric/electronic systems are endlessly growing in complexity with a permanent constraint of a constant or reduced time-to-market. Therefore, there is a strong need to improve constantly the efficiency of the EMC related tasks throughout the entire development process, starting from the design phase until the full-vehicle validation phase. Thus, this Automotive EMC Joint Tutorial & Workshop contemplates two parts: Part I will be a tutorial on numerical simulation in the automotive environment, focusing on EMC. Aiming to provide a holistic and educational approach to understand the different methods and techniques used to mitigate EMI problems in the automotive environment. Part I presentations will cover EMC issues at a system, sub-system, equipment, and component levels. In particular, the speakers' topics will include virtual EMC automotive simulation environments, considering: cables, transistors, PCBs, electric powertrains systems, and electrified vehicles. Part II will be a workshop on automotive EMC. Aiming to present an overview of the most recent industry advances in the field of automotive EMC design, modeling, and simulation, as well as in the field of automotive standards, testing, and measurements. Part II presentations will cover EMC issues at a system, sub-system, equipment, and component levels. In particular, the speakers' topics will include hybrid power-train systems EMC analysis, low frequency magnetic field, antenna implementation, equipment design, printed-circuit-board optimization, electric/electronic component characterization, testing, standards, and regulations.

 

TUTORIAL

  WT-TUE-2

Tuesday, 3 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Fundamentals

  • Frank Leferink, University of Twente, De Lutte,  Netherlands

This tutorial is an overview of many of the major topics that need to be considered when designing an electronic product or system to meet signal and power integrity (SIPI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements. The tutorial will present the foundational ideas from physics and mathematics and will demonstrate the engineering approaches to help the attendees to successfully design, evaluate, diagnose, and/or solve EMI problems. The main objective of this tutorial is to provide a learning opportunity for those that are new to EMC as well as provide a review of the basics to those who already have some experience in this area.

 

TUTORIAL

  WT-TUE-3

Tuesday, 3 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

The Impact of Impulse Noise on the Radio Spectrum Above 1 GHz

  • Jens Medler, Rohde & Schwarz GmbH & Co. KG, Muenchen, Germany
  • Toshio Chiyojima, CISPR SC-I, Yokohama, Japan

Many devices such as computers, multimedia equipment and microwave ovens generate impulsive disturbances in the gigahertz range, even though they are not radios. They must comply with internationally standardized emission limits to ensures an agreed level of radio protection. The weighting of an impulsive disturbance for its effect on the radio communication services is important for the definition of those emission limits. Usage of the APD measurement function is the key for addressing this topic. The APD is the cumulative distribution of the amplitudes of a disturbance within a defined time interval and bandwidth and so it can show how strongly the device under test disturbs digital communications systems. The workshop will address the applicability of the APD measurement function for EMI compliance testing against international CISPR standards and how APD emission limit for electromagnetic pulsed disturbance with low probability of occurrence are defined. It also gives an inside view on the technology of receivers with such measurement function and will conclude with practical use cases.

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-TUE-4

Tuesday, 3 August  • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Protection of Critical Infrastructures Against Intentional Electromagnetic Interference

  • Michael Suhrke, Fraunhofer Institute for Technological Trend Analysis (INT), Munster, Germany
  • Martin Schaarschmidt, Bundeswehr Research Institute for Protective Technologies and NBC Protection, Germany

Intentional electromagnetic inference (IEMI) becomes more and more a threat to modern society since the availability of IEMI sources increases, while modern electronic systems are becoming more vulnerable. Due to the widespread use of electronic systems, that are necessary to build up critical infrastructure, even partial breakdown can lead to a substantial interruption of public life. This workshop focuses on the vulnerability, resilience and protection of typically involved electronic systems.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-TUE-5

Tuesday, 3 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Basic EMC Measurements

  • Monrad Monsen, Oracle, Broomfield, CO, USA

There continues to be those entering the EMC field who are performing measurement activity for both emissions and immunity. In addition, there are practitioners who want to get a second opinion to support what they are doing. They are all at least familiar with basic EMC immunity measurements methods that cover a wide range of electromagnetic phenomena. This tutorial will cover both emissions and immunity by highlighting the latest amendment to a major multimedia emissions standard and a selection of immunity testing standards for transients that are more difficult to implement. The transient discussion will also delve into signals that are high power in a very short time. Also included: a description of emission and immunity test sites, the sites that are becoming popular and their validation requirements, as well as an overview of test setups in these facilities. Where appropriate and if time permits, attendees will be asked questions as to what they have learned and will be given an opportunity to question the speakers at a panel discussion at the end of the session.

 

TUTORIAL

WT-TUE-6A

Tuesday, 3 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Military EMC Tutorial

  • Robert Davis, Lockheed Martin Corp, Syracuse, NY, USA
  • Larry Cohen, US Naval Research Laboratory, Wahsington DC, USA
  • Carl Hager, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division, Dahlgren, VA, USA

The objective of this tutorial is to enhance our attendee’s knowledge and understanding of key aspects of Military EMC that will help them in the performance their jobs. Achieving electromagnetic compatibility with military equipment, systems, and platforms requires significant effort. EMC must be considered at all lifecycle stages and involves first characterizing the operational electromagnetic environment (EME) and then design/testing military systems at various stages of production, assembly and integration. Numerous Military EMC standards and handbooks have been developed for electromagnetic environmental effects (E3) measurements and analysis to reduce the risk of equipment and systems failing to meet their operational performance requirements due to detrimental E3. Additionally, significant spectrum is being shared with commercial entities and hence E3 challenges are increasing. The tutorial will cover a broad range of Military EMC topics specifically including “Standards and DoD Directives & Instructions”, “RF Spectrum Engineering”, “Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance”, “Military Electromagnetic Modelling Techniques” and “RF Test & Measurement Techniques”. The presenters are subject matter experts, representing a cross section of the DoD EMC agencies (Air Force, Army and Navy).

 

TUTORIAL

WT-TUE-6B

Tuesday, 3 August • 13:30 - 15:30 EDT

Risk Management for Future Highly-Automated/Autonomous Systems

  • Davy Pissoort, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Bruges, Belgium

Autonomous systems offer humankind tremendous opportunities, like freeing us from mundane tasks, carrying out risky procedures and generally giving us more time to enjoy the things we like doing. As long as these systems are operating in a human-less environment, like enclosed surroundings in a factory, they are readily accepted. However, people lack trust in autonomous systems if their own safety is dependent on a machine’s correct operation. Whenever someone mentions self-driving cars, the question of safety is raised immediately. It is often argued that if deployed tomorrow, existing self-driving cars would have fewer accidents than those driven by humans. But this doesn’t mean that people are ready to hand-over the steering wheel. We tolerate many thousands of deaths on the road every year, but the very first autonomous- vehicle crash involving a fatality was already headline news all over the world. In the near future, we’ll be interacting with “cobots” – robots intended to assist humans in a shared workspace. For this to happen smoothly, we need to ensure that these cobots will never accidently harm us. This question of safety is paramount and a key- issue for just about every autonomous system. Future applications of autonomous systems will rely heavily on different (wireless) communication technologies to connect and interact with other devices, infrastructure, the “cloud”, etc. Although adding connectivity has its benefits, it also adds challenges and new risks, among which are most definitely its ElectroMagnetic (EM) robustness and resilience. In this tutorial, an overview will be given about the latest evolutions in the area of safety assurance of autonomous systems, with a specific focus on the EMI-related aspects.

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-TUE-7B

Tuesday, 3 August • 13:30 - 15:30 EDT

Reverberation Chambers at the Edge of Chaos

  • Ramiro Serra, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands

In recent years, the reverberation chambers community has been engaged in conversations and disputations regarding the pertinence, the applicability and the usefulness of models inspired in the so-called chaotic cavities Curved diffusers can induce chaos in a closed cavity? Does this chaos yield better performance of a reverberation chamber? Plane wave spectrums or non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonians? Random eigenmodes and the central limit theorem or random matrix theory? However, most of these discussions happen during very brief and limited moments, like, for instance: the five-minute Q&A session after the presentations, during coffee- or lunch-breaks, etc. Moved by the potential interest in having an open and significant discussion, we organized a series of quæstiones disputatæ on the topic of (chaotic) reverberation chambers. These quæstiones will not follow the traditional setup of a workshop or tutorial, i.e. with a series of presentations with limited opposition. On the contrary, they are meant to favor debate, with contrasting positions on crucial questions in the area of chaotic vs. traditional RCs. In this series of dialectics we aim at sharing and confronting valuable clarifications, explanations and definitions which will help the RC (and beyond) community as a whole. Furthermore, we will introduce and recover the, probably forgotten, healthy exercise of debating, which is a very old and very valuable habit of University education and scientific conversation. The debate aims at exchanging, in a polite and educated manner, different points of view, while practicing the gymnastics of argumentation, without shouting, offending or being rude. The goal is not to provide a final and definitive solution to these “disputed questions” in such a short session, but to facilitate the healthy exchange of ideas and opinions.

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-TUE-8A

Tuesday, 3 August

EMC Testing and Design for Cables and Connectors

  • Huadong Li, Molex LLC, Naperville, IL, USA

This workshop will give a general introduction to cable construction, termination and grounding for product EMC. A new test vehicle is proposed for cable and connector assembly EMC testing. Common existing EMC characterization methods for cable and connector shielding will be generalized. Examples of using EMC simulation to control connector radiated emissions and help on harness EMC design will be demonstrated. Approaches of using various cable connector parameters in simulations tools to facilitate cable and connector design for effects such as lightning and HEMP will be described. The tutorial is divided into topics as: Proper Cable Construction and Shielding Termination Techniques; A New Vehicle for Cable and Connector Assembly EMC Testing; EMC Design for an I/O Connector; Using Simulation Tools to Facilitate Cable and Connector Design; Harness EMC Design by Simulation and Validation by Experiment. The workshop will help the audience to properly test and design cables, connectors and their assemblies for product EMC.

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-WED-1

Wednesday, 4 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Impact of Automotive Wireless Power Transfer systems on EMC and EMF safety

  • Tommaso Campi, University of L'Aquila, Terni, Italy

The workshop will focus on the EMC and EMF safety aspects related to the wireless power transfer system applied to electric vehicles (EV). The spread of the static wireless charging system for electric vehicles is increasing sharply and, in the future, the use of the dynamic charging system will also be widely used to extend the range of electric vehicles. These systems based on inductive coupling are very useful because they allow a safe and comfortable charging procedure of batteries in electric vehicles. However, there are several aspects that need to be considered. One of the most important is the magnetic field produced since WPT systems are intentional sources of time varying magnetic fields; field levels can be very high due to the power required by the charging process. Therefore, compliance with current EMC and EMF safety standards is very critical to the success of this technology. The magnetic field generated by automotive WPT systems will be characterized. Subsequently, mitigation techniques based on innovative shielding and compensation circuits will be presented. The impact of the magnetic field on the passengers or pedestrians of electric vehicles will be studied by a numerical dosimetric analysis using sophisticated models of the human body. An overview of standardization and compliance testing methods to evaluate wireless power transfer related to human exposure will also be provided.

 

 

TUTORIAL

  WT-WED-2

Wednesday, 4 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Testing Basics – Part 1

  • Alistair Duffy, De Montfort University, USA    
  • Ross Carlton, ETS - Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

Due to the popularity of this tutorial when it was presented for the first time at the 2020 IEEE EMC+SIPI Virtual Symposium, we have brought it back with the original speakers and updated topics!  This tutorial will cover basic topics in EMC testing – from designing a new laboratory or test capability to achieving accreditation. Presentations will provide practical information and real-world knowledge that can be immediately implemented. While the topics may be basic to EMC testing, we will also discuss nuances that can challenge even the most experienced EMC test practitioner. Speakers include experts who are actively involved in designing, managing, or assessing EMC test facilities. Attendees will quickly learn the best practices in each topic area and have an opportunity to share their own experience and recommendations with the audience.  NOTE: This tutorial is designed as a two-part session. For a complete discussion of the topic, attendees should also attend the EMC Testing Basics – Part 2 tutorial.

 

 

WORKSHOP

  WT-WED-3

Wednesday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Workshop: EMC Consultant’s Toolkit

  • Jerry Meyerhoff, JDM Labs LLC, Buffalo Grove, IL, USA

Provide a wide variety of tools and skills required to be a successful EMC consultant in today’s market. Content: Practical tools & skills expected by Clients from the productive EMC consultant. The major topics will be presented by well experienced practicing EMC consultants and will conclude with an open audience Q & A session engaging all the speakers as panel of experts. Abstract: In the current economic conditions, trends show that many engineering and design firms are focusing on core competencies and outsourcing or reducing staff and other functions such as EMC. Thus unfortunately, many experienced EMC engineers become separated from their corporate work lives.. With the strong rise in the “Internet of Things” (IoT) digital and coding skills are emphasized, yet the underlying complexity and RF basis of wireless is undervalued. Also there is huge growth in Power Electronics applications , which focus on efficiency , often to the detriment of EMC. Many companies like IoT start-ups , that simply do not have the resources to hire a full-time EMC engineer. The purpose of this workshop is to provide an introduction to the technical, business and marketing skills needed by interested EMC engineers , so that they can successfully locate, market and provide effective services to such target companies , all at a fair profit and with high job satisfaction.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-WED-4

Wednesday, 4 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Introduction to EMI Modeling Techniques

  • Karen Burnham, Electro Magnetic Applications, Inc., Lakewood, CO, USA

This tutorial will provide an introduction to commonly used numerical EMC modeling techniques without the need for detailed math. Practicing modelers will also benefit from learning the fundamentals of modeling techniques they are currently not using. Each technique will be presented along with its strengths and weaknesses, so engineers can decide which techniques are appropriate for their types of problems.

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-WED-5A

Wednesday, 4 August • 11:00 - 13:00 EDT

Near Field Methods for Emissions and Immunity Analysis

  • David Pommerenke, Technische Universitat Graz, Graz, Austria

Near-field methods are tools for design and troubleshooting. They can be applied to emission and immunity problems.  The most common, near-field scanning, is used to visualize fields above an IC or PCB. The real challenge, however, is how to use the data. This can be as simple as comparing A to B or visually searching for unexpected fields, but can also involve complex source reconstruction or far-field prediction. Still, one may ask, is the near field the information we want to know? Here, the workshop will address post-processing and other near-field methods. Source reconstruction will be explained. It uses the scanned data in order These sources can be imported into simulations to simulate coupling, for example. A related method, emission source microscopy, visualizes only the radiating sources, but at a cost: resolution is limited. The method is explained and contrasted with near-field scanning. For near-field scanning and emission source microscopy, there are a variety of methods to reduce scan time. They range from pre-scan to self-learning algorithms and will be addressed in the workshop. Having a local probe over a PCB can also be used for susceptibility analysis, such as determining the local response to an ESD-like pulse coupled across the field. This leads to a system-level ESD design and debugging tool for soft failures. The presentation will explain the methodology and its limitations. Once an ESD hits a system, for example at a USB port, the current propagates throughout the system. This current propagation can be visualized with picosecond resolution to show expected and surprising current paths via ESD current propagation measurements Other analysis methods based on local probing show the structural resonance of a PCB or module by measuring the frequency-dependent Q-factor of structures at different locations. Another topic treats source discrimination methods. In many electronic devices, emissions are generated by multiple uncorrelated sources, such as switching power supplies, digital clocks, etc. Traditional sampling methods provide total fields generated by all sources simultaneously, making it difficult to identify sources and estimate their contributions. Source contributions to the total field can be estimated using source separation methods. However, in this case the measurement setup becomes more complicated - additional probes are needed and the phase of the field must be determined. All near-field methods require probes. The ideal probe measures the desired field component and has no cross-field sensitivity and no cable. However, real probes cannot do this. The workshop explains the undesirable probe behavior and shows how to critically characterize probes.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-WED-5B

Wednesday, 4 August • 13:30 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Design Issues for Power Electronics Converters

  • Ilknur Colak, Maschinenfabrik Reinhausen, Regensburg, Bavaria, Germany

This tutorial is intended to address the EMC problems in the high power medium voltage converters and explain the related EMC design steps based on IEC standards. It describes how EMC applies to systems and installations, and also explains proven best EMC practices (implementation of EMC zones, bonding, earthing, when to use filter or shielding, cable layout and cable segregation, preventing grounding loop, routing within the system) in design, assembly and installation to optimize the essential reduction and conform to the standards of electromagnetic compatibility. The tutorial also covers the mechanical instructions when developing new converter design or evaluating existing solutions. The scope of the lecture would be very valuable to those power electronics engineers, mechanical engineers and researchers who are confronted with the practical problems of implementing EMC requirements in their applications and who need a guide to the methods that can be used immediately without performing complex mathematics.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-WED-6

Wednesday, 4 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC for Emergent Wireless Systems

  • Tim Claeys, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Brugge, Belgium
  • Marco Rossi, Fraunhofer-Institut für Zuverlässugkeit und Mikrointegration IZM, Germany

The EEWISE project (EMC for Emergent Wireless Systems) is funded under the combined national and regional programme for Collective Research for the benefits of SMEs (see https://www.cornet.online). The project is a collaboration between the University of Paderborn and Fraunhofer IZM in Germany and KU Leuven in Belgium. The EEWISE project started on Oct 1 2018 and will end on March 31 2021. The EEWISE project is supported by an industrial user-committee comprising more than 30 companies in Germany and Belgium. The EEWISE project aims at finding solutions to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) problems associated with interconnected wireless systems (IWSs). These IWSs are at the very heart of the industries involved in Industry 4.0, the Internet of Things (IoT), and 5G telecommunications, and increasingly important in applications involving, amongst others, smart devices, autonomous vehicles, and healthcare. It is likely that the EU will have 40% of the global IoTmarket. The total number of wirelessly interconnected devices worldwide is expected to reach 20.4 billion by 2020. The relevance of the EEWISE project and its technological ambitions is clear from the combined size and importance of the market for IWSs. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is one of the major hidden challenges for IWSs. Unsurprisingly, the members of the EEWISE consortium are being inundated with an increasing number of questions from industry, especially from SMEs, about how to make their current and future IWSs - often components in applications with stringent reliability and safety requirements - compliant with the requirements set forward by the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and Radio Equipment Directives (RED) in a cheaper and more cost-effective way. The companies have made it abundantly clear that they need breakthrough solutions when it comes to estimating, improving and validating the EMC behaviour of their interconnected systems, especially given the much higher frequencies at which these systems will operate. The EEWISE project will raisethe level of knowledge and effectively deploy this knowledge within the SMEs to design more reliable, safer and smarter IWSs more quickly and at competitive prices, meaning that the international competitiveness of the European companies covered by the project will beimproved, thereby increasingjob opportunities within Europe. The scientific and technological work is organized along 4 research tracks covering, on the one hand, the 3 main steps within a Design-for-EMC/RED approach (characterization and identification of (un)intentional radiating sources, application of dedicated mitigation techniques and measures, and validation and certification of the final product) and, on the other hand, application of this as part of case studies.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-WED-7

Wednesday, 4 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Wireless Coexistence Testing Per ANSI C63.27: Basics and Practical Applications

  • Mohamad Omar Al Kalaa, US Food and Drug Administration, MD, USA
  • Jason Coder, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Silver Spring, MD, USA

This tutorial will review the scientific foundation of wireless coexistence, the unique challenges it raises, and discuss the practical implementation of coexistence testing as specified in IEEE/ANSI C63.27 standard for evaluation of wireless coexistence. This topic is relevant to many industries including medical devices and automotive. For example, wireless coexistence evaluation is recommended in the FDA Guidance document on radio frequency wireless technology in medical devices. FDA recognizes the IEEE/ANSI C63.27 standard and it is often incorporated in the evaluation framework. The speakers include experts who are actively involved in using, writing, maintaining and assessing the use of the standard. Attendees will also learn about the recent revisions being implemented in the standard and what to expect in the new edition, as well as ongoing research in the area of wireless coexistence.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-WED-8

Wednesday, 4 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Grounding and Bonding

  • Daryl Beetner, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO, USA

This tutorial will provide an overview of the topics engineers must consider when performing grounding and bonding in their electronic products or systems. Presentations will cover fundamental concepts common to all grounding and bonding issues, as well as considerations when grounding for safety and lightning, when grounding for low-frequency interference, when grounding for high-frequency emissions/immunity, and when working in the transportation/military industries. The objective is to provide working engineers with a strong basis for tackling their grounding and bonding problems in a more comprehensive fashion than is possible in a shorter tutorial session. This session will be useful to those new to the field, as well as those who wish to brush up on the fundamentals.

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-THU-1

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Advances in Automotive EMC and Connected Car Measurements

  • Martin A.K. Wiles, Albatross Projects GmbH, East Grinstead, UK
  • Achim Goerstner, Rohde & Schwarz GmbH & Co. KG, Dallas, TX, USA

The automotive industry has for some time been going though a period of intense technological change driven by various regulatory, environmental and safety pressures. This workshop has been designed to provide an informative overview of some of the most current and key development areas and the measurement topics associated with them from key industry experts. The session will start by looking at  the Electric Vehicle which is seeing huge growth and is predicted to continue for the next 5 -10 years “EMI compliance and analysis measurements with an FFT-based measuring receiver” looks at how automotive EMI testing is complex and time consuming with an increasing number of potential interferes in an EV. The FFT-based Time Domain Scan increases measurement speed of the EMI receiver. Additionally, it offers functions to find and analyse interferences in the vehicle. The talk presents FFT theory and applies it with practical examples. Regulatory changes with EMC standards in CISPR 25 and ISO 11452-2 have led to EMC EV motor testing becoming increasingly necessary for many Automotive OEMs. The variety of e motors available requires different solutions as well as addressing the different applications required of EV motors. Test facilities that work with electric vehicles (EV) or their high voltage (HV) modules should have a HV safety program to keep personnel safe. This workshop will discuss how to develop a HV safety program for testing EVs and their HV modules. The recommended HV safety program will focus on training, safety assessments and internal audits. Training is required to ensure personnel have the competence to perform HV activities; safety assessments are used determine the risk of being shocked, electrocuted, or experiencing an arc flash; and internal audits are used to confirm the test facility is compliant with its HV safety program. Workshop attendees will be given enough information and examples to help them create a HV safety program for their own test facility. In parallel the connected car with its plethoral of associated technologies including ADAS continues to advance the autonomous driving experience.   “ Radar + EMC”  will look at Radar immunity and the challenges in testing automotive radar under stress and finally  “ADAS + EME”   will look at Electro Magnetic Environment (EME) scenario testing including the recording of RF signals in the environment,  replay of recorded signals in the lab and the challenge of leveling, amplifier  protection, PAPR, signal library and signal handling.

 

 

TUTORIAL

   WT-THU-2

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Testing Basics – Part 2

  • Janet O'Neil, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA     
  • Dan Hoolihan, Hoolihan EMC Consulting, MN, USA

Due to the popularity of this tutorial when it was presented for the first time at the 2020 IEEE EMC+SIPI Virtual Symposium, we have brought it back with the original speakers and topics (updated for 2021)!  This tutorial will cover basic topics in EMC testing – from designing a new laboratory or test capability to achieving accreditation.  Presentations will provide practical information and real-world knowledge that can be immediately implemented.  While the topics may be basic to EMC testing, we will also discuss nuances that can challenge even the most experienced EMC test practitioner.  Speakers include experts who are actively involved in designing, managing, or assessing EMC test facilities. Attendees will quickly learn the best practices in each topic area.  Join us and you’ll see why this tutorial was included in the top five highest attended workshop/tutorial sessions at the 2020 IEEE EMC+SIPI Virtual Symposium. NOTE: This tutorial is designed as a two-part session. For a complete discussion of the topic, attendees should hear the presentations in EMC Testing Basics - Part 1 tutorial.

 

 

WORKSHOP

  WT-THU-3

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

HPEM Effects on Electronic Systems

  • Frank Sabath, Bundeswehr Research Institute for Protective Technologies and NBC Protection, Garstedt, Germany

Intentional EMI is becoming more and more a threat to modern society because the availability of I-EMI is increasing, while modern electronic systems are becoming more vulnerable. Due to the widespread use of wireless systems this risk is increasingly important. Our civil infrastructures depend on the use of modern communication systems, and several research projects have been recently been carried out. In this tutorial we will give an overview of high-power and low-power I-EMI threats, the risks to civil infrastuctures and preventive actions.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-THU-4

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Achieving ESD Robustness Through System Efficient ESD Design Simulation

  • David Pommerenke, Technische Universitat Graz, Graz, Austria

Traditionally, TVS components have been selected based on data sheet specifications. However, the maximum voltage levels that I/Os can handle have been reduced and the design window for high-speed I/O is very narrow such that a data sheet based approach may fail. Voltage margins are often less than 3 V and maximum currents are less than 2A. This must be achieved while ensuring SI up to 20GHz and avoiding harmonics in the RF range. To overcome this, and to be able to use TVS also to reduce soft-failures, a simulation-based approach is required. The Industry Council for ESD Target Levels has named this process "System Efficient ESD Design SEED." It is based on characterizing the three main influencing components in a system: - Passive interconnect - IC and its internal ESD protection These models can be used to simulate the interaction of the components for different stimuli, e.g. contact mode ESD, cable discharge or slower rising air discharge at higher voltages. The tutorial will explain this method in detail and provide examples. This will allow engineers to- Understand the overall concept of SEED and its motivation. perform and understand TVS characterization - understand the capabilities and limitations of models - understand the complex interactions between snap-back components Three lectures will cover TVS devices, characterization, modeling, and combined system-level simulation.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-THU-5

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Theory, Techniques and Applications of EMI/EMC in Modern Power Electronics

  • Shuo Wang, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Applications of modern power electronics have become very popular in the last decades in the applications such as electrification of transportation, consumer electronic product, residential and industry applications, energy, and medical applications, etc. Almost all modern electronic products use power converters. A power electronics system generates significant electromagnetic interference (EMI) due to high current and high voltage switching. The EMI has been headache problems for both power electronics and EMC engineers. The trial-and-error method, which is inefficient and time-consuming, is usually employed in the EMI debugging and suppression in power electronics and EMC industries. As a result, the EMI reduction is costly and the EMI filters are bulky and heavy. To help power electronics and EMC engineers understand EMI/EMC in power electronics systems, and based on the popular hot application topics, we submit a tutorial proposal based on 6 tutorial presentations (presenters are from both academia and industry) across two big tutorial sessions.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-THU-6

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Emerging Technologies: The Impact of Modern Robotics, Data Analysis, and CEM Simulation on Antenna and EMC Measurements in 2021 and Beyond!

  • Dennis Lewis, Boeing, Seattle, WA, USA
  • Zhong Chen,  ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

Today’s EMC and Antenna Pattern Measurements are increasingly complicated and time consuming to perform.  From small wireless devices such as cell phones to large devices such as full vehicles and airplanes, accurate and precise measurements are essential to confirm products perform as intended and comply with industry standards as well as regulations. These product examples are increasingly sophisticated with their widespread use of sensors and wireless technologies, often in an increasingly smaller footprint of the overall product.  This tutorial presents these challenges and reviews a real-world solution. We start with a review of the complexity and challenges presented by testing modern passenger aircraft outfitted with hundreds of antennas that facilitate wireless connectivity, among other applications. A solution to address these test challenges will be reviewed in the form of a novel, robotic test system. While traditional antenna and EMC test facilities are designed with specific measurement applications in mind, modern test facilities employing multi-axis robotic positioners provide a near limitless degree of re-configurability in terms of measurement types and scan geometries.  We’ll provide an overview of this approach for an antenna measurement test range were model based systems engineering and development approaches can be employed to dramatically reduce the time, effort, and cost associated with the test development and validation phases of a given program.  Next, we’ll investigate the challenge of calibrating antennas.  It is difficult to calibrate antennas in an anechoic chamber down to the VHF frequency range because absorbers do not perform adequately at these frequencies.  A study will be shared on calibrating broadband biconical antennas from 75 MHz to 2 GHz in a chamber designed for above 1 GHz measurements. The tutorial will conclude with a discussion on how model-based systems engineering improves the design and optimization of antenna measurement and calibration systems.  Through complementary numerical techniques such as the finite element method (FEM), integral equations (IE), finite element boundary integral (FEBI), as well as shooting and bouncing rays (SBR), one can gain significant insight on performance even before the measurement facility is constructed or the system fully configured.  This new type of testing may be applied to EMC and 5G test applications as well.

 

 

WORKSHOP

WT-THU-7

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Application of Reverb Chambers

  • Vignesh Rajamani, Exponent Inc, Phoenix, AZ, USA

This tutorial will provide an introduction to recent applications of reverberation chambers. It is intended to provide EMC engineers who are interested in applying reverberation chambers to various measurement issues and the extension of reverberation chambers to solve a variety of EMC problems. This half-day tutorial provides a brief overview of Reverb Chamber (RC) theory, followed by recent applications of RCs. The tutorial material will be updated to reflect recent research results and implications. The format will be a conference presentation style (lecture) followed by questions moderated by the chairman. It is designed for both academics and people from industry who will be involved in radiated emission or immunity testing of commercial or military systems using reverberation chambers and will be valuable to personnel evaluating the use of reverberation chambers as a complement to or replacement for other types of radiated test facilities and for personnel who are trying to use statistical methods to characterize the electromagnetic environments.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-THU-8

Thursday, 5 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Overview of the P2716 WG - IEEE Guide for the Characterization of the Shielding Effectiveness of Board Level Shielding

  • Davy Pissoort, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Bruges, Belgium

This tutorial wants to disseminate the results obtained so far by the IEEE P2716 working group to a broad audience. As a reminder we repeat the scope and purpose of IEEE P2716 below: Sccpe: The scope of this guide is to provide manufacturers and users of board level shielding with appropriate methods for the characterization of the shielding effectiveness of the board level shields themselves as well as the way they are mounted on the printed circuit board. This document will guide the user in the selection of the appropriate test method in order to determine the level of shielding provided in the intended application.Purpose: To supplement the work done in e.g IEEE 299, IEEE 299.1 which both cover stand-alone enclosures with dimensions larger than 10 cm. This document provides a standard set of methods and procedures for determining the shielding effectiveness of board-level shields.

 

TUTORIAL

WT-FRI-1

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Modern Automotive EMC Technology – Ensuring Safety and Reliability

  • Garth D'Abreu, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA
  • Robert Kado, Stellantis, Auburn Hills, MI, USA

Automotive EMC Technology continues to dramatically move forward with the growing acceptance of increasingly autonomous-operated vehicles.  At the same time, there is growing concern about the safety of these vehicles with their sophisticated levels of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) capabilities.  ADAS features, including adaptive cruise control, autonomous emergency breaking, lane departure warning systems, and blind spot warning, to name a few, are standard features drivers have come to expect.  Some of these features are mandatory requirements for new production vehicles manufactured in Europe.  Connectivity is also becoming a more prevalent component of the increasingly autonomous vehicle.  Attendees of this tutorial will learn about the latest challenges facing automotive OEMs as well as those that design automotive EMC/Antenna Pattern Measurement (APM) test chambers, and those that offer commercial automotive EMC test services.  Novel solutions to these challenges will be presented, including a discussion on utilizing software to complement automotive component EMC R&D. The tutorial presents different perspectives – both current and future - on modern Automotive EMC/APM Technology.

 

 

TUTORIAL

   WT-FRI-2

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Learn EMC Now! For the Self-learner or the Classroom

  • Keith Armstrong, Cherry Clough Consultants Ltd, Stafford, UK

Every year a new generation of engineers start work for the first time. they have received any education relating to the EMC their work will – these days – require them to deal with, the chances are that it dealt more with electromagnetic theory (i.e. mathematics), than with anything practical or relevant to their work. Experienced design engineers may also require vocational training in EMC, because the continually increasing EMC requirements in all aspects of modern electronic engineering mean they must now deal with EMC as part of their ‘day job’, instead of leaving it to a couple of EMC specialists in an EMC test lab at the end of the project. Where employers are unable or unwilling to themselves provide the necessary vocational training in EMC, these engineers must learn on-the-job. Unfortunately, this can have highly variable results, and can even cause costly delays to project timescales (at least). This tutorial provides many well-proven and free (or at least low-cost) resources to help these engineers get up to speed with the EMC requirements of their work as quickly and easily as possible. It also details some very cost/time-effective low-cost EMC bench testing techniques that have long been used by EMC specialists, that can be easily learned by any practicing engineer and used to help de-risk EMC during all stages of design and development projects. These resources are eminently suitable for use by:   

  1. Individual engineers, for self-training
  2. Employers, in their in-house EMC training programs
  • Educational and training establishments of any type:

  - As parts of academic engineering courses    
  - In vocational ‘continuing education’ courses intended to up-skill their local engineering communities of engineers and employers.

 

 

TUTORIAL

  WT-FRI-3

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Recent Advancements in HEMP, EMP, and IEMI Protection – A Global Perspective

  • Joel Kellogg, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA
  • D. V. Giri, Ph.D., Pro-Tech and University of New Mexico, USA

Despite the threats posed by High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP), Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and Intentional Electromagnetic Interference (IEMI), limited emphasis has been placed on the protection of “critical infrastructure”. In recent years, protection of critical infrastructure from the effects of HEMP, EMP, and IEMI events has been increasing with governments and industries placing more urgency on the need for protection. With heightened emphasis on protecting critical infrastructure and limited direction from governments, industries are struggling to quantify the threat posed by EMP and IEMI and to identify cost effective yet viable protection solutions to EMP and IEMI threats. Speakers in this tutorial will address the challenges to those industries considered “critical infrastructure”, such as utilities (power, water, gas) and services (data, financial, communication). The tutorial will begin with an overview of various technologies and the latest real-world solutions that have been deployed to harden facilities. An example will be shared of an EMP/IEMI hardening solution developed around the IEC-61850 standard - including the design, deployment, and cost benefit analysis. The tutorial will then provide a global review by experts from industry, academia, and government, who will discuss their respective R&D activity on EMP/HEMP/IEMI currently underway in China, Europe, and the Middle East.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-FRI-4

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Lessons Learned Creating Reliable Computational Models for SI and EMC Applications

  • Colin Brench, IEEE, Stow, MA, USA
  • Bruce Archambeault, Missouri S&T EMC Lab, Four Oaks, NC, USA

This tutorial will expose the attendees to the lessons learned by a number of industry experts over the years. The goal being that the attendees will benefit from the, sometimes painful, learning experiences of the presenters. Computational tools are very powerful and invaluable to the modern design engineer but there is still an art to using then effectively. In all disciplines, hindsight is perfect and this opportunity to learn from others is a valuable resource. This tutorial will not only show lessons learned but also expose the attendees to fundamental ways of thinking through their models to better ensure success.

 

TUTORIAL

WT-FRI-5

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 13:00 EDT

Theory, Techniques and Applications of EMI/EMC in Modern Power Electronics

  • Shuo Wang, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Applications of modern power electronics have become very popular in the last decades in the applications such as electrification of transportation, consumer electronic product, residential and industry applications, energy, and medical applications, etc. Almost all modern electronic products use power converters. A power electronics system generates significant electromagnetic interference (EMI) due to high current and high voltage switching. The EMI has been headache problems for both power electronics and EMC engineers. The trial-and-error method, which is inefficient and time-consuming, is usually employed in the EMI debugging and suppression in power electronics and EMC industries. As a result, the EMI reduction is costly and the EMI filters are bulky and heavy. To help power electronics and EMC engineers understand EMI/EMC in power electronics systems, and based on the popular hot application topics, we submit a tutorial proposal based on 6 tutorial presentations (presenters are from both academia and industry) across two big tutorial sessions.

 

TUTORIAL

WT-FRI-6

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

mmWave Devices: 5G Test Challenges and Solutions

  •  James Young, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA
  •  Clive Bax, Bureau Veritas, Santa Clara, CA, USA

As the wireless industry continues to work towards development and deployment of 5G new radio technology, the wireless test and measurement industry is working to develop the required test and measurement capabilities to ensure that these products perform as intended.  In order to develop the optimal test and measurement methodology, it is helpful to have an understanding of mmWave antennas, how they are designed and function, as well how/if their performance is impacted by various usage and/or test environments. We begin the tutorial with a presentation on the mmWave antennas themselves to understand the complexity and nuances of this influential component of wireless devices. The impact of the antenna on end-user products will be discussed.  Are you aware of the impact the clothes you’re wearing may have on your cell phone performance?  The materials used for your home or office building may also impact the use of your 5G FR2 device.  We will discuss the impact of clothes and other common everyday materials on real-world mmWave performance.  Another often overlooked factor that may influence testing of mmWave devices is the actual positioning equipment used.  We’ll review the impact of positioning equipment and support structures during the testing of wireless devices for performance verification.  The tutorial will conclude with a review of the current activity underway in the mmWave Task Group of ANSI C63.  Attendees will learn why this group was formed, the FCC KDB guidance that was published in parallel and based on the work of this group, and gain an understanding of how this group collaborates with industry, test labs, TCBs, and regulators (FCC in the US and ISED in Canada).

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-FRI-7

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

Update on Key ANSI C63 Standards on EMC - A Tribute to Don Heirman's Contributions to ANSI C63.4

  • Daniel David Hoolihan, Hoolihan EMC Consulting, Lindstrom, MN, USA
  •  Janet O’Neil, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

This tutorial will cover several key EMC Testing Standards as well as three fundamental Wireless Testing Standards. Presenters will be EMC Engineers heavily involved in the development of the standards.  We begin with a review of the seminal ANSI/IEEE C63.4 “Test Methods for Low-Voltage Equipment”.  This will be discussed from two perspectives; first, the history of the C63.4 Standard will be outlined with a review of the decades of contributions to the standard by the late Don Heirman.  Second, the current on-going revision of the standard will be discussed by the working group chair.  We will also address the seminal EMC Antenna Standard ANSI/IEEE C63.5.  This standard is currently undergoing a revision as well; the chair of the working group responsible for this “antenna calibration standard” will be the technically competent lecturer. The Wireless Testing part of the tutorial will being with ANSI/IEEE C63.10 (Unlicensed Wireless Devices); this recently published standard will be analyzed by the chair of the working group that developed the standard which is being transmitted to the Federal Communications Commission with a recommendation to incorporate it into the FCC Rules. The second major wireless standard to be discussed is ANSI/IEEE C63.26 (Licensed Wireless Devices). The 2015 version of the standard will be highlighted as well as proposed changes being discussed for the current revision of the standard.  Finally, the NEW wireless standard ANSI/IEEE C63.30 will be reviewed and explained by the chair of the working group that developed the standard.

 

 

TUTORIAL

WT-FRI-8A

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 13:00 EDT

EMC Testing and EMI Mitigation for Safety Critical Aerospace Systems

  • Irfan Majid, Institute of Space Technology, Islamabad, ICT, Pakistan

Abstract Functionally Airborne Electronics Hardware is divided into five categories according to safety criticality of function it performs. Systems whose failure would prevent the continued safe flight of aircraft are categorized as flight critical (Level “A”) and their failure conditions are termed as Catastrophic. Electromagnetic Compliance (EMC) testing methodology, especially for High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) and lightning protection certifications, follows a different methodology as compared to other electrical / electronic systems on board an aircraft. This tutorial will cover the recommended HIRF & Lightning Certification methodology in accordance with SAE ARP-5583 & FAA AC 20-158A recommended practices. Fly-by-Wire flight control system will be considered as representative safety critical system. Main focus will be on Low Level Coupling tests as they simplify the measurement set ups and are much more economical, though this comes at the cost of increased computational complexities to determine test levels. Carrying out these computations analytically and through simulations will be covered comprehensively.  Finally, guidelines for better EMI protection in flight critical systems that help avoid failures in EMC certification, will be presented. Contents Effect of EMI in flight critical Systems Overview of Fly-by-Wire Flight Control System Aircraft Electromagnetic Environment Review of ARP-5583 and AC 20-158A HIRF Certification methodology for Level “A” systems Low Level Coupling (LLC) tests for HIRF Certification Computation/Simulations for test levels for LLC tests EMI protection guidelines for Flight Critical Systems

 

WORKSHOP

WT-FRI-8B

Friday, 6 August • 13:30 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Testing and Design for Cables and Connectors

  • Huadong Li, Molex LLC, Naperville, IL, USA

This workshop will give a general introduction to cable construction, termination and grounding for product EMC. A new test vehicle is proposed for cable and connector assembly EMC testing. Common existing EMC characterization methods for cable and connector shielding will be generalized. Examples of using EMC simulation to control connector radiated emissions and help on harness EMC design will be demonstrated. Approaches of using various cable connector parameters in simulations tools to facilitate cable and connector design for effects such as lightning and HEMP will be described. The tutorial is divided into topics as: Proper Cable Construction and Shielding Termination Techniques; A New Vehicle for Cable and Connector Assembly EMC Testing; EMC Design for an I/O Connector; Using Simulation Tools to Facilitate Cable and Connector Design; Harness EMC Design by Simulation and Validation by Experiment. The workshop will help the audience to properly test and design cables, connectors and their assemblies for product EMC.

 

TUTORIAL

WT-FRI-9

Friday, 6 August • 11:00 - 15:30 EDT

EMC Compliance Techniques for Silicon Carbide (SiC) Power Converters

  • Cong Li, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY, USA

This tutorial is a comprehensive guide to provide engineers with the fundamental understanding of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues associated with the use of Silicon Carbide (SiC) power semiconductors in switch-mode applications. Practical design techniques are presented that help the attendees understand the real-world issues and high frequency techniques necessary to successfully meet the EMI requirements. The seminar provides the necessary EMI theory for SiC power electronics, a new “SOLVE” EMC design flow for SiC power converters, and practical design, construction, and measurement techniques. Practical lessons provide a blueprint for successfully meeting EMI with SiC power converter products. The first section presents the necessary EMI fundamentals for SiC power converter design. Measurement techniques for common-mode (CM) and differential mode (DM) currents, and the circuitry to perform the critical CM/DM separation measurements. The concept of impedance mismatch is presented as a basis for understanding filtering concepts. Practical filter layout methods are presented with measured results demonstrating the advantages of a well-constructed design. The EMI impact of using SiC power semiconductors is compared with the use of traditional Silicon (Si) power semiconductors. The second segment focuses on a comprehensive 5-step EMC design flow for SiC power converters: “SOLVE”. This design flow begins with considerations on electing proper architectures based upon system ratings and EMC specifications. The next steps develop techniques for obtaining component parasitics and layout for the system EMI model. Setting of different filter design aspects include magnetic material selection, structure, and practical filter performance. The last step presents techniques and principles for packaging enhancement. The third section provides examples from practical design techniques and lessons learned for SiC power converter product development. Characterization and importance of parasitics associated with some commonly used passive components are presented and correlated with typical power conversion packaging. These EMC techniques have been successfully used to meet critical EMC requirements for kW to MW applications.

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